P o t p o u r r i--S
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Seed Son: Jesus was the "Seed" Son.
    Paul skips over Moses and the Mosaic Law by 2000 years, all the way to Jesus. The promises were those involving faith, nothing to do with the law.
    The promises were to Abraham and his seed. And that seed (not seeds{plural} of Abraham likeseeds, plural, would have been all descendants all the way down to Jesus) was Jesus.
    There is only one Seed Son. That was Jesus. Follow through: Romans 1:3; Galatians 3:16,29; Matthew 1:1; Psalms 22:30; 89:36. The 42nd generation spoken of in Matthew is the 'seed Son' (Romans 4:13,16) which is us with Christ in us -Colossians 1:27; 1Corinthians 12:12; Daniel 7:27; Psalms 22:30. In this seed (Christ, we in Him) all will be blessed -Galatians 3:8; Isaiah 61:9; Matthew 13:38.
     The 42 generations...

Solomon: Solomon had it all -Ecclesiastes 1:12-18; 2:1-10
    Comprised from Easton's Bible Dictionary: The word 'Solomon' means 'peaceful'. Solomon was David's second son by Bathsheba. He was probably born about B.C. 1035 -1Chronicles 22:5; 29:1. He succeeded his father on the throne in early manhood, probably about sixteen or eighteen years of age. Nathan, to whom his education was entrusted, called him Jedidiah, "beloved of the Lord" -2Samuel 12:24,25. His father chose him as his successor, passing over the claims of his elder sons: " Assuredly Solomon my son shall reign after me." His history is recorded in 1Kings 1-11th chapters and 2Chronicles 1-9th chapters.
    His elevation to the throne took place before his father's death and was hastened on mainly by Nathan and Bathsheba, in consequence of the rebellion of Adonijah -1Kings 1:5-40. During his long reign of forty years the Hebrew monarchy gained its highest splendor. The first half of his reign was, however, by far the brighter and more prosperous; the latter half was clouded by the idolatries into which he fell, mainly from his heathen intermarriages 1Kings 11:1-8; 14:21,31; Nehemiah 13:26 "Did not Solomon king of Israel sin by these things? Yet among many nations was there no king like him, who was beloved of his God, and God made him king over all Israel. Nevertheless even him did outlandish-(foreign; strange; unconventional; bizarre; strikingly unfamiliar - Solomon liked exotic women)-women cause to sin." 
    Before his death David gave parting instructions to his son 1Kings 2:1-9; 1Chronicles 22:7-16. As soon as he had settled himself in his kingdom and arranged the affairs of his extensive empire, he entered into an alliance with Egypt by the marriage of the daughter of Pharaoh (1Kings 3:1), of whom, however, nothing further is recorded. He surrounded himself with all the luxuries and the external grandeur of an Eastern monarch, and his government prospered. He entered into an alliance with Hiram, king of Tyre, who in many ways greatly assisted him in his numerous undertakings. 
   For some years before his death David was engaged in the active work of collecting materials (1Chronicles 29:6-9; 2Chronicles 2:3-7) for building a temple in Jerusalem as a permanent abode for the ark of the covenant. He was not permitted to build the house of God (1Chronicles 22:8); that honour was reserved to his son Solomon. 
   After the completion of the temple, Solomon engaged in the erection of many other buildings of importance in Jerusalem and in other parts of his kingdom. For the long space of thirteen years he was engaged in the erection of a royal palace on Ophel -1Kings 7:1-12.
    It was 100 cubits (one cubit is 18-22 inches – arm's length to tip of middle finger) long, 50 broad, and 30 high. Its lofty roof was supported by forty five cedar pillars, so that the hall was like a forest of cedar wood. In front of this "house" was another building, which was called the Porch of Pillars, and in front of this again was the "Hall of Judgment," or Throne room (1Kings 7:7; 10:18-20; 2Chronicles 9:17-19), "the King's Gate," where he administered justice and gave audience to his people. This palace was a building of great magnificence and beauty. A portion of it was set apart as the residence of the queen consort (his companion), the daughter of Pharaoh. From the palace there was a private staircase of red and scented sandal wood which led up to the temple.
    Solomon also constructed great works for the purpose of securing a plentiful supply of water for the city -Ecclesiastes 2:4-6. He then built Millo for the defence of the city, completing a line of ramparts (a fortification consisting of an embankment, often with a parapet {a low protective wall or railing along the edge of a raised structure such as a roof or balcony} built on top) around it 1Kings 9:15,24; 11:27. He erected also many other fortifications for the defence of his kingdom at various points where it was exposed to the assault of enemies -1Kings 9:15-19; 2Chronicles 8:2-6.
    Among his great undertakings must also be mentioned the building of Tadmor in the wilderness as a commercial depot, as well as a military outpost. 
   During his reign Palestine enjoyed great commercial prosperity. Extensive traffic was carried on by land with Tyre and Egypt and Arabia and by sea with Spain and India and the coasts of Africa, by which Solomon accumulated vast stores of wealth and of the produce of all nations -1Kings 9:26-28; 10:11,12; 2Chronicles 8:17,18; 9:21.
    This was the "golden age" of Israel. The royal magnificence and splendour of Solomon's court were unrivaled.-...continues 

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