P o t p o u r r i--E,  P a g  e  2
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elders: The "elders" of the New Testament-church were the "pastors" (Ephesians 4:11), "bishops or overseers" (Acts 20:28), "leaders" and "rulers" (Hebrews 13:7; 1Thessalonians 5:12) of the flock.
    Everywhere in the New Testament bishop and presbyter are titles given to one and the same officer of the Christian church. He who is called presbyter or elder on account of his age or gravity is also called bishop or overseer with reference to the duty that lay upon him -Titus 1:5-7; Acts 20:17-28; Philippians 1:1. See 'church authority'.

Elijah: (from Easton's Bible Dictionary
"Elijah is suddenly introduced to our notice in 1Kings 17:1 as delivering a message from the Lord to Ahab. Having delivered his message to Ahab, he retired at the command of God to a hiding place by the brook Cherith, beyond Jordan, where he was fed by ravens. When the brook dried up God sent him to the widow of Zarephath, a city of Zidon, from whose scanty store he was supported for the space of two years. During this period the widow's son died and was restored to life by Elijah -1Kings 17:2-24. During all these two years a famine prevailed in the land. 
    Elijah met Obadiah, one of Ahab's officers, whom Ahab had sent out to seek for pasturage for the cattle and bade him go and tell his master that Elijah was there. The king came and met Elijah and reproached him as the troubler of Israel. It was then proposed that sacrifices should be publicly offered, for the purpose of determining whether Baal or Jehovah were the true God. This was done on Carmel, with the result that the people fell on their faces, crying, "The Lord, he is the God." Thus was accomplished the great work of Elijah's ministry. The prophets of Baal were then put to death by the order of Elijah. Not one of them escaped. Then immediately followed rain, according to the word of Elijah, and in answer to his prayer -James 5:18
    Jezebel, Ahab's wife, enraged at the fate that had befallen her priests of Baal, threatened to put Elijah to death 1Kings 19:1-13. He therefore fled in alarm to Beersheba and thence went alone a day's journey into the wilderness, sitting down in despondency under a juniper tree. As he slept an angel touched him and said unto him, "Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee."
    He arose and found a cake and a cruse (small container) of water. Having partaken of the provision thus miraculously supplied, he went forward on his solitary way for forty days and forty nights to Horeb, the mount of God, where he took up his abode in a cave. Here the Lord appeared unto him and said, "What dost thou here, Elijah?" In answer to his despondent words God manifests to him his glory and then directs him to return to Damascus and anoint Hazael king over Syria and Jehu king over Israel and Elisha to be prophet in his room -1Kings 19:14-21; 2Kings 8:7-15; 9:1-10
    With one of the free Bible computer programs, type in Elijah, and read about his remarkable life.
    More on Ahab.

Elisha: (from Easton's Bible Dictionary
"Elisha was an attendant and disciple of Elijah -1Kings 19:16-19. His name first occurs in the command given to Elijah to anoint him as his successor -verse 16.
    This was the only one of the three commands then given to Elijah which he accomplished. On his way from Sinai to Damascus he found Elisha at his native place engaged in the labours of the field, ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen.
    He went over to him, threw over his shoulders his rough mantle (a large over-garment) and at once adopted him as a son and invested him with the prophetical office.
    Elisha accepted the call thus given (about four years before the death of Ahab) and for some seven or eight years became the close attendant on Elijah till he was parted from him and taken up into heaven (the air; off the ground and away from view) -2Kings 2:1. During all these years we hear nothing of Elisha except in connection with the closing scenes of Elijah's life. After Elijah, Elisha was accepted as the leader of the sons of the prophets and became noted in Israel.
    He possessed, according to his own request, "a double portion" of Elijah's spirit (2Kings 2:9) and for the long period of about sixty years (B.C. 892-832) held the office of "prophet in Israel" -2Kings 5:8
    After Elijah's departure, Elisha returned to Jericho and there healed the spring of water by casting salt into it -2Kings 2:21. We next find him at Bethel (2Kings 2:23), where, with the sternness of his master, he cursed the youths who came out and scoffed at him as a prophet of God who was bald:-"Go up, thou bald head."
    The judgment at once took effect and God terribly visited (2Kings 2:24) the dishonour done to his prophet as dishonour done to Himself. Similarly it happened to Jesus
    We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2Kings 3:9-20); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (2Kings 4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (2Kings 4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (2Kings 4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (2Kings 5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan where iron floats (2Kings 6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come -2Kings 6:24-to 7:2
    We then find Elisha at Damascus, to carry out the command given to his master to anoint Hazael king over Syria (2Kings 8:7-15); thereafter he directs one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Israel, instead of Ahab. Thus the three commands given to Elijah (2Kings 9:1-10) were at length carried out. 
    We do not again read of him till we find him on his deathbed in his own house -2Kings 13:14-19. Joash, the grandson of Jehu, comes to mourn over his approaching departure, and utters the same words as those of Elisha when Elijah was taken away: "My father, my father! The chariot of Israel and the horsemen thereof." 
    Afterwards when a dead body is laid in Elisha's grave a year after his burial, no sooner does it touch the hallowed remains than the man "revived and stood up on his feet" -2Kings 13:20,21."
    With one of the free Bible computer programs, type in Elisha, and read about his remarkable life. A story about his remarkable confidence in God -2Kings 6:8-23, and a story about iron floating.

Enoch: was the seventh from Adam. He was the son of Jared, and father of Methuselah. After the birth of Methuselah, his son, Enoch "walked with God three hundred years", when he was translated without tasting death. When he was translated, only Adam, so far as recorded, had as yet died a natural death, and Noah was not yet born.

ephod: something girt, a sacred vestment worn originally by the high priest (Exodus 28:4), afterwards by the ordinary priest (1Samuel 22:18) and characteristic of his office -1Samuel 2:18,28; 14:3. It was worn by Samuel and also by David -2Samuel 6:14. It was made of fine linen and consisted of two pieces, which hung from the neck and covered both the back and front, above the tunic and outer garment -Exodus 28:31. That of the high priest was embroidered with divers colours. The two pieces were joined together over the shoulders (hence in Latin called superhumerale) by clasps or buckles of gold or precious stones and fastened round the waist by a "curious girdle of gold, blue, purple, and fine twined linen" -Exodus 28:6-12.
   The breastplate, with the Urim and Thummim, was attached to the ephod.

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To a woman, anything a man says after the last argument, is the beginning
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