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-heathen: (Hebrew – plural goyim). The word in the original simply means 'nations' and came to denote those nations that were not Israelites. 
    At first the word goyim denoted generally all the nations of the world -Genesis 18:18; compare Galatians 3:8.
    The Israelites afterwards became a people distinguished in a marked manner from the other goyim. They were a separate people (Leviticus 20:23; 26:14-45; Deuteronomy 28), and the other nations, the Amorites, Hittites, etc., were the goyim, the heathen, with whom the Israelites were forbidden to be associated in any way (Joshua 23:7; 1Kings 11:2). The practice of  idolatry was the characteristic of these nations, and hence the word came to designate idolaters (Psalms 106:47; Jeremiah 46:28; Lamentations 1:3; Isaiah 36:18), the wicked (Psalms 9:5,15,17). 
   The corresponding Greek word in the New Testament, 'ethne', has similar shades of meaning. In Acts 22:21 and Galatians 3:14, it denotes the people of the earth generally; and in Matthew 6:7, an idolater. In modern usage the word denotes all nations that are strangers to revealed religion.

Hebrews:-A name applied to the Israelites in Scripture only by one who is a foreigner (Genesis 39:14, 17; 41:12, etc.), or by the Israelites when they speak of themselves to foreigners (Genesis 40:15; Exodus 1:19), or when spoken of an contrasted with other peoples -Genesis 43:32; Exodus 1:3, 7,15; Deuteronomy 15:12. In the New Testament there is the same contrast between Hebrews and foreigners -Acts 6:1; Philippians 3:5. Also see 'Israel':-

-holy: Cherished, reverenced for having the clean and pure nature of God including honesty and sincerity. Holy Bible refers to -2Timothy 3:16; Luke 4:4; Proverbs 30:5; Job 32:8

-hope: is the confident, the sure expectation of things, a feeling which evinces positive expectation. The opposite of hope is despair. You can't have hope feeling guilty
    Hope is the feeling you have that the down feeling you may have now isn't permanent ... Jean Kerr. Hope is the realization that there is a better tomorrow.
    Hope comes from studying to understand the scriptures -Romans 15:4 "For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope."
    As Christians we have much reason for hope -Ephesians 1:18 "The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints." Colossians 1:27 "To whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory."
    Hoping for good, is better than expecting bad.

Christ in us is our hope -1Timothy 1:1; Colossians 1:27; Titus 2:13. He is our hope of salvation -1Thessalonians 5:8.
    It is a "lively", a living hope and the proof of whether or not you are born again is this hope -1Peter 1:3. If you have this lively hope (excited about it, hot for God), then you can be sure that you are born again. If you don't...
    1John 3:3 shows that one is pure when he has this hope (alive to Christ in him). The verse says purify self. One doesn't purify himself, as such. He brings forth the purity within him (Christ in him) by believing (be living to, be alive to) that which he knows to be true of Him, thus purifying himself by His word that you are holy, pure, clean and righteous. From this attitude in God, we proceed to live our lives, now with His continuous guidance to erradicate all offensiveness from our personalities.

-humility: To make yourself low (the way of the world is to always put the self first; word is rooted also in 'submission to authority' – or, to be willing to do what Christ wants us to for our and others' benefit).
 

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