C h r i s t i a n  K e y s
O r i g i n a l  W o r d s  N o t e s

-Christ: Means anointed One (anointed of the Father to be Lord of all);-the One who came to Earth in the physical body of Jesus for reasons of bringing mankind into the God family

-come: Various OG & OH words used (see Strong's Concordance for original meaning for word in question in whatever verse)

-contrite, contrition: Occurs in OT only; means 'crushed, crumbled, collapsed, bruised, sincere remorse for wrongdoing; repentance' in some places and in Isaiah 66:2 means 'smitten'. See 'Abased'. 

-covenant(s): Means 'agreement'. The word is used with reference to God's revelation of himself in the way of promise or of favour to men. Thus God's promise to Noah after the Flood is called a covenant (Genesis 9; Jeremiah 33:20, "my covenant"). God's covenant consists wholly in the bestowal of blessing -Isaiah 59:21; Jeremiah 31:33,34. God is a good God.

-conversation: In the New Testament means 'conduct' except in Philippians 3:20 where the original is 'commonwealth of citizens'. In the Old Testament, it means 'manner', 'moral character', 'road', 'pathway'.

-crucifixion: This was regarded as the most horrible form of death, and to a Jew it would acquire greater horror from the curse in Deuteronomy 21:23. 
    This punishment began by subjecting the sufferer to scourging. In the case of our Lord, however, his scourging was rather before the sentence was passed upon him and was inflicted by Pilate for the purpose, probably, of exciting pity and procuring his escape from further punishment -Luke 23:22; John 19:1. 
    The condemned one carried his own cross to the place of execution, which was outside the city, in some conspicuous place set apart for the purpose. Before the nailing to the cross took place, a medicated cup of vinegar mixed with gall and myrrh (the sopor) was given, for the purpose of deadening the pangs of the sufferer. Our Lord refused this cup -Matthew. 27:34. The sponge full of vinegar, sour wine, posca, the common drink of the Roman soldiers, which was put on a hyssop stalk and offered to our Lord in contemptuous pity (Matthew. 27:48; Luke 23:36), he tasted to allay the agonies of his thirst -John 19:29,30. The accounts given of the crucifixion of our Lord are in entire agreement with the customs and practices of the Roman in such cases. He was crucified between two "malefactors" and was watched by a party of four soldiers (John 19:23; Matthew 27:36,54), with their centurion. The "breaking of the legs" of the malefactors was intended to hasten death, and put them out of misery (John 19:31); but the unusual rapidity of our Lord's death (John 19:33) was due to his previous sufferings and his great mental anguish. He literally died of a broken heart, alone, God having taken the Holy Spirit from Him (Mark 15:34) in order that He be made guilty (2Corinthians 5:21), in order that He be made a curse (Galatians 3:13) for all those who couldn't keep the Mosaic Law perfectly (everybody) and who would need to live by His faith.-Galatians 2:20. 
    A flowing of blood and water poured from the wound made by the soldier's spear -John 19:34. Our Lord uttered seven memorable words from the cross, namely, (1) Luke 23:34; (2) 23:43; (3) John 19:25,26; (4) Matthew. 27:46; (5) John 19:28; (6) 19:30; (7) Luke 23:46. 
 

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