G l o b a l  W a r m i n g ,  P a g e  1 b
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Astronomers call it the Maunder minimum. Glaciers in Norway and Switzerland expanded down mountain valleys, overrunning farms. The Thames River in England froze for the first time in history.-The current warming trend appears to be a balancing for that colder period. One principle of the Universe is that all things eventually balance. "Human actions also appear to have the potential to affect global climate. Aerosols.(small particles).in the atmosphere are increasing, mainly as a result of the emission of sulfur dioxide from fossil fuel burning and also from biomass burning. These can absorb and reflect solar radiation.(eventually altering health). In addition, changes in aerosol concentrations can alter cloud amount and cloud reflectivity. These processes tend to produce cooling, which can, in some areas, offset warming due to an enhanced greenhouse effect. The lifetime of these aerosols in the atmosphere is much shorter.(days to weeks).than most greenhouse gases.(decades to centuries), so their concentrations (and thus their climatic impact) respond much faster to changes in emissions." ... source
    Solar activity increased sharply from early 1997 to late 1998 according to NASA's, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.(SOHO).

Report Magazine, Alberta Edition September 11, 2000 "James Hanson, head of NASA's Goddard Institute of Space Studies in N.Y. states carbon dixiode is "not the main contributor to global warming" and that "economically wrenching" measures will not be needed. 
    The fossil fuels that produce most of the CO2 also throw sulfates and soot into the air, which contribute to cooling, "a cooling so great that Hanson estimates that  it has the same magnitute but a sign that is opposite that of CO2 forcing." In other words CO2 cancels itself out because of the byproducts it comes with. "In addition, global CO2 has actually decreased. In 1998 and 1999, the world economy expanded at 6.8%, yet carbon emissions fell in both of those years."

James Kasting, geoscientist at Pennsylvania State University says "The ocean's carbonate supply.(used to make shells and corals).is replenished by carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide that was once in the air ends up at the bottom of the ocean as carbonate rock. The process has helped keep global warming under control...The process...is a powerful regulator."
    "Most plants, termed C3 plants after the type of photosynthesis they use, require about 150 ppm.(parts per million).of carbon dioxide to photosynthesize. Kasting says, "C3 plants make up about ninety five percent of what's out there, including most of Earth's substantial array of food crops."
    Man's additions of CO2 into the atmosphere.(never mind global warming – 33 Soviet satellites are right now leaking radiation into lower space from their onboard nuclear reactors).are a small second order effect, since the extra CO2 is reabsorbed into the sea and biosphere at rates determined by temperatures which are controlled by primary greenhouse gases and thereby largely by various aspects of solar activity. 

The following three letters were to.American Scientist, November / December, 1999, Volume 87,
    1) "How significant is C02 in the atmosphere? My engineering colleagues and I have long been aware that, on a molar basis, the radiative absorption coefficients of water and of CO2 are very close in magnitude. Indeed, for some engineering calculations it is common practice to add the two concentrations and treat the gas mixture as one substance. In the furnaces we study, the molar ratio of water to CO2 is 2:1 and so the CO2 proves important. In the atmosphere, however, the ratio is about 30:1.(assuming 50 percent relative humidity at 60 degrees Fahrenheit). That is, the average atmospheric absorbing gas composition is about 97 percent water and 3 percent CO2. With CO2 variations well inside the noise of the water fluctuations, how can this gas be important?" ...Robert H. Essenhigh, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University." 
   2) "The current, historically high concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere may trigger rapid climate change to either a hotter or a cooler climate. The mechanism behind such shifts is unknown. Furthermore, there is considerable evidence that past climate variations did not result from changes in CO2concentrations. Dr. Kendrick Taylor states that greenhouse gas concentration means little "as long as the climate system stays within the stable mode range." Because the records from both satellites and weather balloons show no warming in the atmosphere from 5,000 to 25,000 feet over the past 20 years of extreme CO2 levels, we still seem to be in a stable mode. Numerous records of surface temperature also show little or no warming over the past 40 to 50 years. This demonstrates that climate is not sensitive to CO2 at concentrations up to present levels.-...continues


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