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thermodynamics (laws of)
Thermodynamics is the science that deals with the relationship of heat and other forms of energy such as mechanical energy, called thermodynamic (means, operated by heat converted into motive power), and the conversion of one into the other, however, thermodynamics should not be applied on the molecular scale enthalpy-(Hess's law)
    The laws of thermodynamics which apply to common objects cannot be described at the molecular level as the vast numbers of moving molecules are impossible to accurately quantify, because there is no know equation which would provide us with accurate positioning and velocity (speed)-factors in order to ascertain exactly what each molecule is doing and where it may be doing it at any particular time, as well as determine variables involved in molecular motion due to extraneous conditions. 
0) If systems A & B are in thermal equilibrium, and B & C are in thermal equilibrium, then A & C are also in thermal equilibrium. This law is tacitly assumed in every measurement of temperature. 
1) Known as the law of energy conservation: This means the energy after an event is equal to that before it. This 1st law states that nothing is now being created in the physical universe so far as science can tell. For example, the neutrino carries exactly the amount of energy needed to balance the energy accounting for the reaction – the disintegration caused by the event. Energy can be neither created nor destroyed; heat and mechanical work being mutually convertible. Neither mass nor energy can be created from nothing. Every effect must have a cause. This first law states that all forms of energy can neither be created nor destroyed, only transferred.
    According to Isaac Asimov, the first law "is considered the most powerful and most fundamental generalization about the Universe that scientists have been able to make" ... In The Game Of Energy And Thermodynamics You Can't Even Break Even", Journal of Smithsonian Institute-(June 970), page 6.
2) It is impossible for an unaided self acting machine to convey heat from one body to another having a higher temperature. Entropy is a thermodynamic state function. This-second law-(entropy) states that the amount of energy disorder in any isolated system (the Universe and the self acting machine for examples) cannot decrease with time, as the total energy remains constant; however, the amount of energy available to do useful work consistently decreases. The entropy in a system can be thought of as how close it is to equilibrium. Once maximum entropy is reached, no further changes can occur in the system. A heated cup of coffee returns as quickly as it can to the ambient temperature. Untreated steel left in a field quickly breaks down and is absorbed by the ground from whence it first came. Physical things run down. They go from complex to simple.
    Classical thermodynamics measures the unavailability of energy for further work. Statistical thermodynamics measures the decreased order of structure within a system, and informational thermodynamics measures lost or distorted information.
3) It is impossible by any procedure, no matter how idealized, to reduce any system to the absolute zero of temperature (0ºK/273ºCelsius/-459ºFahernheit) in an infinite number of operations. This law states that the entropy of a perfect crystalline substance at absolute zero is zero. More on thermodynamics.

tin-noun
a malleable, silvery metallic element obtained chiefly from cassiterite (a tin ore). It is used to coat other metals to prevent corrosion and is a part of numerous alloys, such as soft solder, pewter, type metal, and bronze. Atomic number 50; atomic weight 118.69; melting point 231.89°C; boiling point 2,270°C; specific gravity 7.31; valence 2, 4. 2. Tin plate. Tin can.

transgress, transgressed, transgressing, transgresses-verbs
transitive senses-to go beyond or over (a limit or boundary); exceed or overstep; to act in violation of (the law, for example)
intransitive senses-to commit an offense by violating a law or command; sin; to step across
transgressible, transgressive-adjectives
transgressively-adverb
transgressor-noun

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