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macerate, macerated, macerating, macerates-verbs
transitive use-to make soft by soaking or steeping in a liquid; to separate into constituents by soaking; to cause to become lean, usually by starvation; emaciate
intransitive use-to become soft or separated into constituents by soaking; macerate-noun-a substance prepared or produced by macerating
maceration, macerator or macerater-nouns

Marx, Karl. 1818-1883. German philosopher, economist, and revolutionary. With the help and support of Friedrich Engels he wrote-The Communist Manifesto-(1848) and-Das Kapital-(1867-1894). These works explain historical development in terms of the interaction of contradictory economic forces, form the basis of all communist theory.

materialism, materialist-nouns
Philosophy--the theory that physical matter is the only reality and that everything, including thought, feeling, mind and will, can be explained in terms of matter and physical phenomena; the theory or doctrine that physical well-being and worldly possessions constitute the greatest good and highest value in life
materialistic-adjective
materialistically-adverb

mis-1-pref
bad; badly; wrong; wrongly: misconduct.; failure; lack: misfire; used as an intensive (misdoubt)

mortal-adjective
liable or subject to death; of or relating to humankind; causing death; fatal (a mortal wound)
mortally-adverb

masturbate, masturbated, masturbating, masturbates-verbs
intransitive use-to perform an act of masturbation
transitive use-to perform an act of masturbation on
masturbation-noun
excitation of one's own or another's genital organs, usually to orgasm, by manual contact or means other than sexual intercourse
masturbational or masturbatory-adjective
masturbator-noun

miseducate, miseducated, miseducating, miseducates-transitive verbs
to educate improperly
miseducation-noun

Mongol Tartars (Tatars)-noun
a member of any of the Turkic and Mongolian peoples of central Asia who invaded western Asia and eastern Europe in the Middle Ages (13th century); they were also known as Tartars; the Mongol leader originally was Genghis Khan; under Genghis' grandson Batu Khan eastern Europe was overtaken; the Tatars (as the Europeans came to call them) crossed the Ural River reaching into Russia, taking Moscow, Kyiv and other cities; they passed into Hungary and Poland; the Tatars imposed a control of people bureaucratic system which included methods of tax collection; communications helped the Mongols maintain their vast and diverse empire, common lineage also played an important role; the great khan was always selected by a convocation of the nobles of the whole empire and, in general, all four khanates shared in the plunder of each; it is understood that Ashkenazic Jews are native to, or have antecedents in eastern and central Europe; their standard native language, Yiddish, is spoken in the Baltic countries and in the northwestern areas of Russia and by Jewish immigrants or descendants from those areas; a southern branch having central and southeastern subgroups includes the dialects spoken in Poland, Romania and Ukraine; 
    Ashkenazi is one of the two major groupings of Jews (Ashkenazis & Sephardic) by geographical origin and the corresponding cultural tradition; the term distinguishes the medieval Jewish communities of central and eastern Europe and their descendants from those of the Iberian Peninsula and North Africa, known as Sephardim. In the 10th century, the biblical eponym Ashkenaz (see Genesis 10:3) was used by Jews as the Hebrew name for Germany, where a distinctive Jewish community was emerging; from the Rhineland (a region along the Rhine River in western Germany including noted vineyards and highly industrial sections north of the cities of Bonn and Cologne), Ashkenazic Jews moved eastward into Poland during the 15th and 16th centuries; it's interesting to note the letters in their name spell out nazi; were these culturally historical descendents responding as may have been their destiny -Isaiah 10:5-7,12,24,25; 14:25-27.

comprised from "Mongol Empire & Ashkenazim," Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © All rights reserved

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