C r e a t i o n ,  P a g e  6 8
-
 
One type of butterfly, the Morpho rhetenor has an astonishingly impressive blue colour it gets, not from pigments but from light being broken up by tiny prisms on its wing scales. At rest, only the underside of its wings are seen and are brown with eyespots for disguise. ...Focus Magazine, December, 1999.
    Another type of butterfly, the Papillo palinurus is the only butterfly to make its hues entirely mechanically – God throwin' us a curve again! – This remarable butterfly bounces light around in microscopic bowl shaped crevices in its wings. This makes the butterfly appear a lush green color.
    According to Peter Vukusic, team head at Exeter University investigating this phenomenon in Nature Magazine, volume 404, page 457, as reported in New Scientist Magazine, April 1, 2000 "From the flat centre of each bowl, you get yellow light reflected, and from the sloping sides you get blue reflectivity."
    The Hedyloidea nocturnal (night time) butterfly has ears on its wing.
    Jayne Yack of Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, says "The general feeling is that butterflies as we know them were once more moth like, and at some point they they moved 'into the day'. What we don't know is what caused them to move into the day." Hey Jayne? God did it!
    The incredible journey of the Monarch butterfly poses heretofore unanswerable questions for anyone leaving God out of the picture.
    And, the hawk moth is really different!

DUCKBILLED PLATYPUS:-Where does evolution explain the process by which the male duck billed platypus retains a venomous spur in its rear ankle, yet the female loses her spur in the first year? Why this is produced and then disappears in the first year is a conundrum for evolution.
    These animals are part of the world's electric animals' club. Other members of this exclusive club are moles and electric eels. Their complex systems seem to posit too many questions for evolutionists.

DRAGONFLIES:-A dragonfly comes from the water bug, and after its metamorphosing, it breaths air! It can travel at over 60 miles an hour (100 kilometers an hour).
    Dragonflies are examples of remarkable aerodynamical design, long having puzzled scientists in just how it is that they keep aloft. Recent research show how important the air is to a dragonfly's wing. To a dragonfly's wing, the air is viscous, enabling its fluttering wings to create whirlwinds to help hover and fly. The inertia of air molecules creates a significant force that enables dragonflies to get lift, thrust to turn, and to maneuver.
    Jane Wang, physicist at Cornell University, New York state, who is using a computer model to simulate the airflow around dragonfly wings, reported his findings at the American Physical Society in Minneapolis late March, 2000. ... New Scientist Magazine, April 1, 2000.
    Some species of dragonflies only come out at night. How did this first type of dragonfly know to come out only when blackbirds and thrushes wouldn't be around to prey on it? And why don't all dragonflies do the same. Others survive in the daylight.

FEATHERS:-"The whole constitution and design of feathers seems to be extraordinarily cunning. On feathers, the keratin molecule has been made stiffer by cross linking the molecular chains with sulfur atoms." ... James E. Gordon, Professor Emeritus of Materials Technology at University of Reading, Structures, (1978) Penguin Books, London, England.
   The central shaft of a feather has a series of barbs projecting from each side at right angles. Rows of smaller barbules in turn protude from both sides of the barbs. Tiny hooks, called barbicels, project downward from one side of the barbules and interlock with ridges on the opposite side of adjacent barbules. In some feathers there may be as many as a million barbules cooperating to bind the barbs into a complete feather, impervious to air penetration." ...Evolution: Possible or Impossible?, page 215.

ANIMAL HAIRS:-The cuticle (outer wrapping) and medulla (inner core of the hair) show a wide variety of patterns which differ between hair types and species. The wool fibers of sheep lack the medulla. In a simple thing like a hair's structure, we see diverse yet related parts among its types. Surrounding the medulla are cortex cells.
    Animals have an inner 'clock' whose ticking away determines when some animals shed.
    All mammals possess mammary glands, but only marsupials (having a pouch, like a kangaroo) and placentals (having placenta) have nipples! Marsupials have a pouch, but lack placenta. Within the pouch is the nipples. All mammals have a neopallium, but only the placentals have a connection between the two cerebral hemispheres (left and right brain), the corpus callosum.
    The digestive and sexual systems of marsupials varies. Some ferment foods before being returned to the intestine. The sexual system of some includes a forked penis, which fits well with the multiple vaginas of the female.-...continues


Subject Sampler_List of Topics_Search
A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ
Questions Lists_Free Stuff_Entrance
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
.
.
.
.
.