C r e a t i o n ,  P a g e  6 3
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The 7 inch diameter star shaped Star of Bethlehem orchid from Madagascar, has an almost 12 inch  long slender nectar tube. It takes a special moth, the hawkmoth (moth family Sphingidae, in the order Lepidoptera {butterflies and moths}) with its 11 inch proboscis to be attracted in order to do the pollination. Unlike butterflies, hawkmoths hover in the air while feeding at a flower, similar to the actions of hummingbirds. Under cold conditions, hawk moths may quiver flight muscles to generate heat before flying off. Known as thermoregulation, this behavior is unusual in insects. ... comprised from information in Smithsonian Magazine, April, 2000, 'Birds, Bees, And Even Nectar Feeding Bats Do It', and Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99.
    Bees see colors we don't. We see colors they can't. Ants and bees can't see red. Hummingbirds like red best. 
    "The oak toad uses its versatile eyes to push food down its throat! It does this by moving its eyeballs into the root of its mouth." ... Discover Magazine, December 99, page 96. Diversity of design in eyes of animals is phenomenal!
    How does the toad know which way to go when in spring it emerges from its soil covered burrow in the earth?
    How does it know what his tongue is for? How's it able to identify its ability to shoot out his sticky tongue so it can draw in the bugs it retrieves? How does the toad know it's a terrestrial (relating to Earth or its inhabitants) being when it was hatched in a pond?
    Toads control slugs and grasshoppers and other bugs by eating them.
    And oh! The wasp!

INSECTS:-Insects have ultraviolet vision enabling them to see special markings on flowers that enable them to see deep inside the flower to the nectar wells, similar to how pilots use runway lights to guide them upon descent. Insects are the only invertebrates that fly.

PEAHENS:-Among peahens the most attractive peacock types are the ones with the biggest fans. But the big fan on the tail makes it difficult to escape a predator. The big fan peacock type of peahen has the least chance of survival. Is this a problem for Darwin's idea of "survival of the fittest"? Why would evolution have evolved that which would tend to decrease chances of survival? 

RED HARVESTER and other ANTS (Pogonomyrmex barbatus):-How did the inheritance of ant colony behavior evolve? What past conditions contributed to this? Why do some colonies reproduce more than others? Why does the behavior of ants in a colony, as well as how they relate to each other, change as the colony grows older and larger? Why does a colony live from ten to twenty years, yet single ants live only one year? Ant colony behavior is extremely complex. Biologists admit a lack of understanding here. Why does God do things as He does?
    Being in such close quarters, ants have a way to ward (keep safe) off disease. They make their own antiseptics. 
    Ants have many tasks that they had to know from their beginning to survive. Tasks involving collecting and distributing food, building a nest, care for the eggs, larvae and pupae, knowing when to quickly repair the damaged nest, etc. And in all this, task allocation continues to be a mystery. 
    The queen exercises no authority. The workers 'somehow' know to switch tasks as needed, some foraging (searching) for food, others repairing the nest, etc., yet a different group may do these functions another day. Ants do several tasks. "An ant does not respond the same way every time to the same stimulus; nor does a colony." ... Deborah M. Gordon, Professor of Biology at Stanford University. Her book is Ants At Work: How An Insect Society Is Organized. We do not understand behavior here, in that, for one example, how they know to maintain 5 millimeters of space allotted per ant. They have some built in sense of density. 
    The conundrum is that ant behavior lacks identity and agency, yet their overall behavior arises from interactions between these components. Ants form huge colonies and exhibit a high organizational pattern. Where does the information come from to build such elaborate nests? They seem to utilize patterns that are intrinsic. Why are their levels of activity periodic? Sometimes the nest is quiet. other times a flurry of activity abounds. This activity is apart from their DNA and bespeaks rules beyond individual ant actions -Isaiah 40:26,28 "Lift up your eyes on high, and behold who hath created these things, that bringeth out their host by number. He calleth them all by names by the greatness of his might, for that he is strong in power; not one faileth. Hast thou not known? Hast thou not heard, that the everlasting God, the LORD, the Creator of the ends of the earth, fainteth not, neither is weary? There is no searching of his understanding." Some things we may go on forever trying to understand, like water.
    Sterile worker class ants pose another problem for evolution. That of the loss of reproductive potential in most individuals of a species. The workers are the vast majority of both ants, wasps, bees, etc. As Darwin himself said "it posed a special difficulty which could prove fatal to his theory", in that the structure of the workers would not be affected by natural selection because they are sterile and produced no offspring. 
    Why is it that unfertilized any eggs develop into males?

APHIDS:-Dying aphids send an alarm signal to warn others about trouble. Other trouble can be that of becoming a slave.
    Aphids got antifreeze!

DHOLES:-Although there are several females in a pack (up to 25), only one female does all the breeding and mostly from one male. Another conundrum for evolution, as the struggle for life and reproduction is dealt another blow. Study on natural history –-www.naturalhistory.com.

SPIDERS:-"Without spiders, within 6 months most of our crops, trees and grasses would be gnawed to their roots by unchecked hordes of locusts and other herbivorous insects. While these are eating the plants, the numbers of disease carrying mosquitoes, flies and ticks-(wingless blood sucking insects or mites, insects with 4 pairs of legs, etc. that infest {harmfully inhabit}, man, cattle, sheep, etc.) would increase exponentially and would feed on us." ... Kityn Cayley, scientist of biodiversity at the American Museum of Natural History.-...continues

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