C r e a t i o n ,  P a g e  5 7
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Some animals have elaborate mating rituals. Why would they have evolved this complicated unnecessary reproductive trait? Other animals just do it! Why is there a mating season for animals? Why not for humans? What were the evolutionary processes that removed this in homo sapiens (humans)-lineage, yet retained this in animals?

FLIES:-Insects comprise 90% of animal species and 10 billion of them occupy each square kilometer (2.6 square kilometers in a square mile, so 26 billion in a square mile) of land of this Earth. 
    Insects are the only invertebrates with the ability to fly. Some insects survive only one summer. Others come back the following year.
    In experiments with flies, the cells were exactly the same number, though they were able to mutate a fly at one half the usual size. "Everything was in perfect proportion, just smaller" says Thomas. How is it that the cells 'sense' the total mass? Is there built in programming in each cell, yet undetected by present observational means? 
     Compared with an insect, such as the dragonfly, or a bat, the airplane is a simple study in aerodynamics. Dragonflies and flies (houseflies) have an impressive aerodynamic ability to maneuver.
    The common housefly can fly backwards and land upside down (and even can use its wings to do the backstroke in your bowl of soup – happened to me more than once; those yucky things are remarkable all right – ha ha! – yes, I ditched the soup and it was hard, being of Scottish descent, but I did it cause I heard these bothersome pests poop everywhere and even several times a minute). 
    "The common housefly utilizes wing movements beyond the scope of aerodynamics to explain. This fly has the remarkable ability to recapture energy lost to the air. It does this by flapping its wings forward, then flipping them over so the leading edge points to the rear before flapping them back." … Michael Berkinson, University of California. Their flight is different from other fliers in that it involves a sculling motion similar to rowing a boat, where other fliers use straight flapping (one exception  is the hummingbird {a possible why?}).
    The Biomechanics of Insect Flight-(aerodynamics and ergonomics of moving throught the air) by Robert Dudley, Princeton University Press, ISBN 0691044309, can give you everything you may have wondereed about regarding insect flight.
    And you thought your hard drive was fast!
    Flight just did not occur once in the fossil record. There are 4 different fliers reptiles, as represented by pterodactyls, modern birds, mammals, as represented by the bat and flying insects. There are too many different characteristics for all of these to come from a common ancestor. In fact, within the Brine fly family there are vast differences. 
    The designing mind behind it all appears to be light years beyond our ability to figure it all out, confounding us as we examine the designs He makes work the way He wants, but we're trying
    The odds of evolution alone having occurred make evolution an absolute, complete and irrevocable statistical impossibility and odds of parallel (side by side) evolution occurring defy description and move further into the absurd-realm
    The insect pond's eyes come with built in polarization to block the glare of the Sun.
    "Mayflies are unusual in being the only insects that molt after forming functional wings." ... The Amber Forest, page 93.
    If you ever get a chance to see a fruitfly under an electron microscope, you'll be amazed at the design, and you'll also understand why a decision to adhere to something can often preclude information to the contrary, and in the case of evolution, adherence requires blind faith to remain within that decision.

TARDIGRADES:-One of the things contributing to evolution's funk is this little animal that can float in clouds all the way around the world. These mites can shrug off lethal radiation, survive 100 degrees Celsius down to absolute zero, survive in a vacuum, endure pressures nearly six times that of the deepest ocean trench, and go without water for more than a century! How can an animal completely shut down its metabolism, yet retain cellular structure? This is what the tardigrades do! And they do it by losing most of water they have in their bodies and using a sugar called trehalose to stabilize their cellular structure. 
    Attempting to answer all the possible questions these little animals elicit, is like trying to answer by conjecture, the question, Is there such a thing as nothing? 
    If evolution be true, why weren't these characteristics passed on to all animals? Surely it's a "survival of the fittest" trait worthy of being passed on! No. Instead this little animal is reductio ad absurdum to evolution.-...continues

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