C r e a t i o n ,  P a g e  5 6
.
 
Professor Tylervolk, New York, calls Gaia a thing, a system comprising earth's soils, oceans, atmosphere and biomass. Gaian studies show how things circulate through this system. Gaia is about biology, earth sciences and complex systems and their symbiosis (the many and varied ways that creatures have of coming to depend on one another). 
    There appears long term stability in the environment as evidenced by the release of dimethyl sulfide by plankton.
    The Oxford Conference of the Gaians suggested that "the more intimately life intermingles with its physical environment, the more the two move toward stability"; the corollary to that being, in the light of evolution occurring with its single life forms, there must have been instability. Stability does not come from instability without direction or intelligent purpose. An unstable bridge is made stable only after much planning and effort (R&D).
    Continuing to attach intelligent morphoses to unstable components by using concepts like 'natural selective abilities'-(natural selection) attempts at propping up the decaying philosophically maladjusted illusion evolution has proven itself to be, and details time away from progressive efforts in positive directions. 
    The intricate balance of our ecosystem argues strongly for the existence of an interdependent very complex world, of which evidence is available everywhere we may look. 
    Even the Earth's temperature has been finely set to maintain an overall balance by automatic slight adjustments! The Earth's climatic system contains a perfectly balanced thermostat; albeit, one we all complain about, yet nevertheless, one we can all function because of.

From an article in New Scientist Magazine, November 20, 1999: 
    Red tide is caused by tiny dinoflagellates that stain the sea red or brown when conditions cause a disturbance of the water around them, activating their chemical flashbulbs.
    Just how did they come by this bioluminescent ability if not by the design of God? Even Darwin admitted he couldn't imagine an accounting for this ability, especially so when one considers the Anglerfish.
    Michael Latz, a marine biologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and Jim Rohr, a fluid dynamist working for the US Navy, were amazed by how Dinoflagellates reveal the motion of fluids to the naked eye. Different types of dinoflagellate gave the same result. "I was just amazed how repeatable this was," says Rohr. "No one had ever dreamt that their response could be calibrated." But surely plankton in a current can no more tell whether the water is moving than we can feel the Earth flying through space? How do they do it? The answer has to do with the mechanical strain of relative motion.
    No one knows exactly how, but one layer of water shearing past the next deforms the dinoflagellates and makes them light up, perhaps due to forcing channels in the cell membrane to open. This may bring about a change in pH (acid, alkaline balance) which in turn speeds up an enzyme driven, light generating chemical reaction. 

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR:-One of the original evolutionists, Lamark, a believer in the inheritance of acquired characteristics, stated in Darwin's Origin of Species, "the long neck and limbs of the giraffe are explained as having evolved by the animal stretching its neck to browse on the foliage of trees." 
    Typical of evolutionary thinking is; they had a need, so it evolved. Really scientific! It's like Rudyard Kipling's story for children about a curious young elephant getting its nose stretched by a crocodile, with the result that elephants everywhere now carry a trunk. There's no evidence in the real world for the inheritance of acquired characteristics.-
    "How is animal size controlled? How does each cell 'know' that there has been enough growth and replication to make an animal of normal size? No one has any idea how a cell senses that." ... George Thomas, developmental biologist at the Freidrich Meischer Institute in Basil, Switzerland. Biologists even shrunk cells and enlarged them, yet the resulting animals were the usual size, simply having more or fewer cells than normal.

Why have some-species as old as 500 million years escaped evolution? Evolutionists have no answer apart from conjecture. Mollusks (genus Neopilina) – 500 million years old; Cockroach – 250 million years old; Horseshoe Crabs – 200 million years old; Crocodiles – 140 million years old; Niles Eldredge's humorous answer "There is a big lucky aspect to this." 
    And just why didn't the Horseshoe Crab be as non resistant to pollution as other marine anthropoids (more highly developed). Is this unnatural selection of adaptionnegating Darwin's theory? The same applies to the pollution bearing qualities of some trees like Gingko. 
    Peter Holland, University of Reading, who works on lancelets (they look like a small fish), says that "they have hardly changed since the Cambrian Era and are as complex as they possibly can be, given the number of genes they have". Lancelets still have about twenty thousand genes, while all the other vertebrates have seventy thousand. Evolution has yet to answer the differences to quantitative science.-...continues

I n d e x-----------------------

Subject Sampler_List of Topics_Search
A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ
Questions Lists_Free Stuff_Entrance
.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
-
.
.
.