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Eyelids:.Try closing one eyelid and hold it closed. It's hard to keep it closed. It wants to be open. Now, if you close the other one, then the stress is gone. Either both open or both shut is where it feels best. They were designed to work together.

Why is there stress when you try to contravene the normal way? And what is the normal way? Any way that transgresses a major principle of the universe, that of balance, becomes abnormal and produces stress, such as severe time constraints.upon you; and such as – seed bearing grass heads such as wheat, having been tampered with to produce increased yield, can no longer withstand the strong winds and break under the strain. So let's tamper some more shall we, and try to engineer a stronger stalk. Mankind will often risk disrupting the balance for the sake of greed. 

When blinded by greed, man makes things worse for the future; but like, who cares, right? If it's a better bottom line today, that's what counts! More for me now, while the future is raped, and an inferior forced product is created for consumption now, is the thinking man consistently shows.
    Being of greed mentality eradicates peace of the heart. Along with greed, comes its cousins, haste, anger, frustration, intolerance, and impatience.
    No wonder exhibiting 'intelligence' as this, man has devised the crackpot theories he has; evolution being one of them.

Eye:.Many complex factors support the eye's ability to provide vision. By examining the eye we have discovered that the laws of optics conform to principles God has used throughout His creation. The eye itself has neural circuits for vision using the principles of efficient coding.

Yet, Brittlestars beat the best technology man has to offer in our highly engineered technological world of marvelous contraptions. 

God has designed optimal solutions in efficiently representing images of the visual environment in many types of eyes.
    Engineers now focusing upon the problem of image compression are watching emerging results in neuroscience. But more remarkable still is that the principles used to design these futuristic devices may mimic those of the human brain.

The following comprised from the article 'Vision and the Coding of Natural Images' in.American Scientist, May/June, 2000: David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel at Harvard University have charted the receptive fields of the eye's neurons discovering the eye's spatially localized, oriented and 'bandpass' properties. That is, each neuron in this area responds selectively to a discontinuity in luminance at a particular location, with a specific orientation and containing a limited range of spatial frequencies. 

Dennis Gabor's (famous for his invention of holography) work shows the function that is optimal for matching features in time varying signals simultaneously in both time and frequency is a sinusoid with a Gaussian (bell shaped) envelope. These describe extremely well the receptive fields of neurons in the visual cortex. From this its been concluded that the that the cortex is attempting to represent both space and spatial frequencies. But, why is such a joint space frequency representation important if not otherwise suited to natural image's statistical structure?

D.J. Field, 'Relations between the statistics of natural images and the response properties of cortical cells',.Journal of the Optical Society of America, A, 4:2379-2394, discovered such statistical consistency in natural scenes that he decided to investigate whether these receptive fields (Gabor, above) of cortical neurons are somehow tailored to match this structure. His findings point to these receptive neurons being tuned to respond to certain patterns inherent in all natural scenes. The algorithm for finding sparse image codes (only a small part of the neurons in the cortex are active, the remainder being at rest) is know as independent components analysis. This analysis reveals the hidden structure in many sorts of complex signals. The visual system seems to obey the principles of efficient encoding.
    "There is evidence that histogram equalization goes on in the eye. Such a histogram can be thought of as a representation of how frequently a typical photoreceptor in the eye experiences each of the possible light levels. In reality, the situation is more complicated, because the eye deals this vast dynamic range in a couple of different ways. One is that it adjusts the iris, which controls the size of the pupil (and thus, the amount of light admitted to the eye) depending on the ambient light level. In addition the neurons in the retina do not directly register light intensity. rather, they encode contrast , which is a measure of the fluctuations in intensity relative to the mean (average) level....Natural signals exhibit a fractal character." ...D.J. Field, Department of Psychology professor, Cornell University and Bruno A. Olshausen, Ph.D. in computation and neural sciences, California Institute of Technology.

Taste:.Tastes are affected by proteins. For example; the protein mGluR4 is able to detect glutamate (as in monosodium glutamate). Others are involved in tasting sweet, sours, etc. Without proteins life would be bland, to say the least.

Birds have 25-70 taste buds, humans 10,000. If evolution be true, it certainly is unfair; for why should man enjoy more subtleties of taste? If God be true, then we see why:.Matthew 6:26; 10:29-31

Senses of hearing, sight and touch allow us to effectively interact socially. Man is designed to be a social being.

Air:.Space is a vacuum. Earth is the only place where we find air, one of the factors making it so perfectly habitable for man. There are far too many perfect designs making life and sustenance of life available for man to have occurred by chance.
    Higg's theory is built on the idea that the vacuum is really a structured medium.....continues

I n d e x...........................

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